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Access "Why you don't need public cloud for mobile file-sharing"

Published: 03 Jun 2013

A few months ago, I presented a session at the Modern Infrastructure Decisions conference in New York. One of the questions from the audience was something that I’ve heard a lot recently. I said that, in today’s world, IT departments must provide some kind of modern mobile file-sharing solution. If you don’t like or trust Dropbox, fine; there are dozens more to choose from, such as Box, SugarSync, SkyDrive and Google Drive. I don’t care which option companies choose. I just care that they choose one of these rather than the old-school network share that requires a user to be connected to access files, a desktop OS and a virtual private network. “But what you don’t understand,” an attendee said, “is that we can never go to these types of solutions, because our company will never allow all those corporate files to be out there in the public cloud.” But here’s what I argue: You can implement modern mobile file-sharing options without using the public cloud. You can run them 100% on premises, giving your users all the features they need and bringing your ... Access >>>

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